Hangzhou bookstore blends postmodern and classical elements

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Large geometric Display stands intersect with imposing metal archways In just this recently-opened book shop in Hangzhou, China made by Alberto Caiola.

Harbook store by Alberto Caiola

Called Harbook, the 600-sq.-metre shop along with the West Lake was built by Alberto Caiola to appeal to the youthful city consumer.

Together with textbooks, Harbook incorporates other Life-style components As an example a cafe, as well as a showroom for Danish up to date furnishings model Normann Copenhagen, in to the building.

“For countless decades, town – and its famous West Lake especially – has inspired writers, philosophers and poets,” explained the design workforce. “Harbook proceeds this legacy, rising town’s literary Way of living to include nods to European traditions, on the other hand that has a progressive existing-day solution.”

Harbook store by Alberto Caiola

The shop’s present-working day-fulfills-common notion is mirrored in the interior structure and style, which the designers said was influenced by an “imaginary cityscape” theme.

A series of arches intended to evoke classical Italian porticos slice in the Area although standalone Screen stands developed up of intersecting geometric styles are arranged like towering sculptures.

Harbook store by Alberto CaiolaThe geometric varieties, and primarily silver and pink colour palette blended with accents of vibrant colour, lend the interior a postmodern edge that offsets the store’s a good deal a lot more classical elements.”Thematically connecting Harbook’s urban elements of socialising, cultural exchange, shopping and dining, these design elements create a quite literally immersive dialogue between eras and cultures, providing a sensual journey through the space,” added the designers.

Harbook store by Alberto Caiola

Although mostly open-plan, the different areas are clearly defined by the change in floor level and material.

Laid out over stepped shelving, the furniture display is backdropped in dark grey while a set of stairs lead to a raised cafe area decorated in dusky pink.

Harbook store by Alberto Caiola

Overlooking the city’s West Lake, the cafe features a floor made of traditional, locally-sourced Chinese bricks that pay homage to the bookshop’s location. The architects said the cafe is intended as a “dream-like” space where customers can meet with friends, work, or read.

A gridded LED light installation, which stretches across the ceiling of the bookstore, serves as a focal point for the interior and, according to the designers, is also a metaphor for the enlightenment attained through reading.

Harbook store by Alberto Caiola

 

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