Edward Ogosta overhauls California bungalow with “clarity and restraint”

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California firm Edward Ogosta Architecture has drastically remodeled a corner-ton residence into “an personal pocket of luminosity, environment, and serenity” in a neighborhood Beach front town.

The white Corner Pocket Household sits beside a chaotic junction in Manhattan Seashore – A part of the Higher La region.

Edward Ogosta Architecture remodelled and extended the 1950s bungalow, so much so that appears like a new project. The existing roof was flattened and all of the exterior walls finished in smooth white plaster.

The LA-based firm completed the project for Alison and Jeff Goad, and their three children, who wished “to buffer the house from street noise, yet requested large openings between a new living, dining, and kitchen space, and access to the outdoors”.

The single-storey house measures 1,986 square feet (185 square metres) and is rectangular in plan, created by an old and a new volume, with a spacious courtyard that merges indoor and outdoor spaces.

Roughly 70 for each cent of the home footprint was still left in place. The entrance 50 percent was demolished, whilst the rear portion that accommodates a few bedrooms plus a two-vehicle garage was preserved.

“Local codes severely reduced the available building envelope with increased corner site setbacks, height limits, and ordinances protecting the mature tree onsite,” said Edward Ogosta Architecture. “In order to economise the budget, most of the existing house was to remain.”

The extension is positioned along its street-going through corner and has a different family room, dining nook and kitchen area. This new double-top quantity characteristics skylights and it is flanked on possibly facet with sliding glass doors to meet out of doors parts.

In keeping with the homeowners’ desire for a more quiet house, oak cabinetry in the kitchen runs along the home’s street-facing facade to form a thickened acoustical barrier.

“By means of clarity and restraint, your house resolves its active corner ailment, leading to an intimate pocket of luminosity, atmosphere, and serenity,” the agency explained.

Other skylights are located in a hallway that connects the bedrooms, bathroom and laundry, and another is positioned above the shower in the master ensuite.

All inside walls are white, with floors both polished concrete or bleached white oak. The end result is actually a up to date aesthetic realized While using the pared-again content and colour palettes.

“Ogosta unified the old and new architecture with a restrained aesthetic and a material palette inspired by local whitewashed bungalows, raw concrete sea walls, beach grasses, sand, and driftwood,” said the firm.

From a sustainability perspective, the areas of the roof that are not shaded by trees have photovoltaic panels to power to the home, and help charge the owner’s electric vehicle. “The owners report these panels generate 100 per cent of their electricity, making this an off-the-grid, net-zero energy building,” said the firm.

Edward Ogosta Architecture has similarly renovated and extended another mid-century bungalow in California. Called Rear Window House, it was named one of the AIA’s best small projects of 2018.

Pictures is by Steve King.

Project credits:

Contractor: Greg Ronkainen, MFR Development
Structural Engineer: Jim Orland, Orland Engineering

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